Surplus to requirements

An old abandoned farm cottage, South Island, New Zealand.

If you drive far enough on New Zealand’s country roads you’ll stumble on a sight similar to this. You might assume it’s a sad reminder of rural depression, economic failure and abandonment. Somebody gave up and walked off the land. That scenario, while not impossible, is very unlikely.

Look around and you’ll notice the old house is sitting in a quiet corner of a working farm. It’s a sign of progress and changes in agricultural practice. Perhaps farm amalgamation or the introduction of modern machinery made the farm worker redundant. He would have moved on to another farm or a nearby town for work. If the cottage is old enough, and this one might be, it was the first house on the farm, with fruit trees planted in the front garden (this one is a pear), while the land was being “broken in”. As the years passed the owner moved up to a bigger and better home for his growing family. But if it has a roof, it has a purpose, so this old house has followed a familiar life cycle of home, storage shed, hay barn, and animal shelter before settling down as a picturesque ruin. The history of rural life in four walls.

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