Advice from a friend

Vintage postcard of a dog chasing geese, posted 1905.

On the face of it, the subject of this old postcard looks like it might have a limited market but the person who bought it in 1905 thought it would drive home his message to a friend perfectly. It was mailed to a Mr. P. S. Wilson by someone with an illegible signature who added just one line of advice at the bottom – “Dear Pat, Don’t chase a goose, aim for something higher”.

In the 19th and early 20th century, the word goose could be used to describe a “silly person” (Blackie’s Standard Dictionary c.1918) and, it has to be said, was most often aimed at a woman. A shallow or superficial person, easily exited, and not very bright. What some unkind people would call an “airhead” today. Modern dictionaries, by the way, will tell you it means “simpleton” which raises a mere derogatory term to a much higher level of insult.

Was Pat’s friend giving advice about geese in general, knowing Pat’s usual choice of female company? Or did he have one particular goose in mind, which seems likely from his use of the singular? And was he still Pat’s friend after he posted this card?

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A Graphic World

I quoted some interesting text from an old school geography book called ‘The World’ in an earlier post, but one of the things that prompted me to buy it – for loose change at a second-hand stall – was the graphic art at the head of each continent’s section. Published around 1913 or 1914 by McDougall’s Educational Company Limited, the illustrations suggest the influence of Art Nouveau, a movement that was going out of style by that time. Unfortunately the artist’s identity is confined to the initials A.D. in the corner of each drawing.

graphic_Europe

Europe

graphic_East

The Eastern Continent

graphic_Africa

The Dark Continent

graphic_America

The New World

(Yes, it seems school text books still called Africa “The Dark Continent” in 1914!)