Wanganui part 2: “the Rhine of New Zealand”.

The Wanganui up-river tourist trip to Pipiriki, per new river steamboats, discloses leagues of winding waters bounded by the evergreen banks of a bewitching land—a nature’s garden, sprinkled all around by bright patches of green and red, by green lawns and grasses, trees and shrubs; uniform plantations of stately poplars and gums, and irregular clumps of firs.

Then the scene changes as the little steamer clips round some water serpentine into a river reach, bounded by majestic rocks.

Pipi_river

The river becomes very tortuous, through wildest and most beautiful country, till Pipiriki is reached. This settlement, which is full of interest to tourist or traveller, is fifty-nine miles north of Wanganui.
[Cyclopedia of New Zealand, 1897. Abridged.]

Pipiriki landing

Pipiriki landing in 1905.

Pipi_Houseboat 225The delightful spot where the Houseboat is moored is near where the Ohura River, one of Wanganui’s largest tributaries, joins the main watercourse by falling in over a ledge.

The Houseboat has a dining saloon, social hall, smoking-room and lounge, and promenade decks, and is fitted with electric light, bathrooms, and lavatories. This floating palace forms an ideal holiday resort, combining the charm of an open-air riverside picnic with the comforts and attention of a first-class hotel. It affords accommodation to travellers up and down the river. On the down journey lunch is here partaken of, and on the up journey, taking two days from Pipiriki to Taumarunui, the night is spent on board.

Pipiriki houseboat 2

The upper deck contains the dining, social, smoking rooms etc., and the lower deck provides two-berth sleeping accommodation for about sixty persons. The Houseboat is the property of Messrs A. Hatrick and Co., of Wanganui, who control the tourist trade on the river. They also possess a large, modern hotel at Pipiriki, and provide a fleet of eleven steamers, specially built in England for the tourist traffic. The steamers travel from Wanganui to Taumarunui, the terminus of the Main Trunk Railway, connecting in this way with Auckland and Rotorua.
[Caption from a Stereo card of the houseboat by Rose’s Stereoscopic Views, Melbourne, Australia. c.1909. Abridged.]

Pipiriki House 2

Alexander Hatrick, who promoted the river internationally as the “Rhine of New Zealand” even though the two have little in common, bought Pipiriki House in 1901 and doubled its size. It burned down in 1910.

Pipiriki House

Undaunted, Hatrick replaced his hotel with this one which lasted until 1959, when it also burned to the ground. It wasn’t rebuilt.

Pipiriki porch

The view from the new Pipiriki House after 1910.

Pipi_excursion_Manuwai

The stern wheel paddle steamer Manuwai was Hatrick’s biggest river boat, pictured here on an excursion in the Wanganui’s lower reaches in 1905. The upstream section from Pipiriki to Taumarunui required smaller boats that could handle being winched over some of the rapids.

If you want to relive the old days on the Whanganui river, you can take a summer cruise in the restored paddle steamer Waimarie, built in 1899. The season starts October 20.

Image sources: counting down from the top – 2, 3, 5 and 8 are from the Te Papa collection, the rest are from mine.

Flying to Milford

Friday Flashback

M_Queenstown airport-2

This is New Zealand’s Queenstown airport in August 1979, ten years before the first jet aircraft arrived. Much of the business then relied on tourist flights in small ‘planes like these. I had something bigger for my flight to Milford Sound

M_Britten-Norman Islander-3

but not by much. I was lucky enough to get a seat beside the pilot after the Britten-Norman Islander had been refueled at a mobile Mobil station.

Milford flight 1-4

Queenstown is a mountain resort so the views of the Southern Alps are spectacular if you fly there. I don’t know about you but when I’m faced with a magnificent scene like this, with the natural environment stretching away to the horizon in all its awe-inspiring grandeur, I can’t ignore the little voice inside that says …..
“If anything goes wrong with this aircraft, there’s nowhere to land”.

Milford flight 6-2

A view to the left from the cockpit.

MacKinnon Pass

Approaching MacKinnon Pass on the Milford Track. It’s the little snow covered ridge in the foreground. Once over the pass, turn left.

M_Sutherland Falls-3

Fly directly at Sutherland Falls – the highest in the country with a 580 metre (1908 feet) vertical drop – until the cliff face ahead completely fills your windshield then pull up for a glimpse of Lake Quill, flick the ‘plane on a wingtip to execute a 180 degree turn, and continue to Milford Sound.

M_Mitre

Images of Mitre Peak have become something of a tourist cliché but you can’t fail to be impressed when you stand in its presence. It dominates the landscape and demands your attention.

Unfortunately my visit was cut short. I barely had time to fire off a couple of cliché’s and get bitten by the infamous sandflies when the pilot called us back to the aircraft. A nasty weather front was heading our way from the Tasman Sea and it would be best if we got out ahead of it. You should expect this in Fiordland where conditions can change rapidly, especially in winter.

We piled back into the Islander and he flew us to the seaward end of the Sound. It was part of the flight plan we’d already paid for, and maybe he wanted to prove there really was a nasty front out there. And there really was. Dark cloud, rain and, no doubt, turbulence rolling towards us. Time for another one of those 180 degree wingtip turns.

Wakatipu reflections

Friday Flashback to 1979

If you ever get to visit Queenstown in New Zealand’s South Island, you won’t know where to point your camera first. The area is a photographer’s paradise. Lake Wakatipu is a good place to start in any season, whatever the weather.

Lake Wakatipu 4-3

A very cold morning in August 1979. I was grateful for the red boat to inject some warmth into the scene.

The Remarkables make a spectacular backdrop and you won’t have much trouble finding an angle to fit them in. An Australian travel writer once noted that if they were located in a less reserved country they’d be called the Bloody Astoundings.

Lake Wakatipu 1-3

Winter sun disolves the clouds to reveal the jagged face of the Remarkables.

You probably shouldn’t expect to find tranquil urban scenes like this, today, anywhere close to town. It’s safe to say, without linking to boring pages of stats and charts, that Queenstown’s resident population has at least doubled in the past 40 years – and is expected to double again in the next 40, although it’s anybody’s guess where they’re going to live with the area bursting at the seams already. And then you can add the tourists….. These images were made when most of the daytime action was still on the skifields, before Queenstown became the self-styled, year round, all seasons ‘Adventure Capital of the World.’

Lake Wakatipu 9

 The Cecil Peak barge moored at Queenstown wharf. This is an essential piece of farm equipment for the station across the lake which has no road access.

Now we have tandem paragliding, zip lines, and – heaven help us – the hydro attack, not to mention people jumping out of perfectly functioning aircraft at 15,000 feet. Before the bungy was invented there was the lake, Earnslaw cruises, amazing scenery, and fresh mountain air. They’re still there if you want them.

Lake Wakatipu 7

Cecil Peak is on the left, Walter Peak with cloud cap at centre. The red funnel at right belongs to the vintage lake steamer t.s.s. Earnslaw.

Next Friday – a flight to Milford Sound.

Yeomen of the Guard

Mantled in hoary grandeur and serenity, the Tower crowns the Pool of the mighty waterway that makes London the first and richest of the ports of the world. Sentinel of London for 25 generations, it stands magnificent and unmatched, defying Time as it has defied the fret and scour of a hundred thousand tides swirling turbulent past its defences.

Tower

In its day, a fortress, a royal residence, and a state prison. The White Tower, the oldest part of the present fortress, dates from soon after William the Conqueror. (postcard caption)

Here, where kings ruled a nation that knew not Parliament, our Law had its cradle. Here is still the home of the forerunners of our first regular Army, the Yeomen of the Guard. As Yeomen warders they still guard the Tower, still carry out the nightly ceremony of the King’s Keys as performed without a break for over 600 years.

T_warders

Postcard by Valentine c. 1908.

It is all done by candlelight, a tallow candle flickering in a lantern carried by a drummer to enable the Chief Warder in his Tudor bonnet and scarlet cloak to lock the gates, and, the keys having been saluted by the troops, to carry them for the night to the King’s House. After that no one may enter or leave the Tower without the password, which, changed each night, is known, apart from the garrison, only to the King.
‘London’, Arthur Mee, Hodder and Stoughton Ltd., 1937.

The Pool of London is no longer the hub of commerce on the Thames but the Ceremony of the Keys has survived to entertain curious tourists every night at 10 p.m. You’ll need to book your ticket well in advance, or hope for a cancellation in the next twelve months. And don’t worry, visitors are escorted to the the gate when the ceremony is over and you will be allowed to leave.

A Donkey on the Lawn

Friday Flashback to Arncliffe in 1973.

Arncliffe 2

 

The village of Arncliffe lies in the Yorkshire Dales National Park, England, and is a popular spot today with cyclists, walkers and people who enjoy fly fishing in picturesque streams (even when they don’t catch anything).

Fans of British TV soap operas will know it was the original location for Emmerdale Farm, first broadcast in October ’72 and still running. The Falcon Inn was cast as The Woolpack pub. Arncliffe’s time in the showbusiness spotlight ended four years later when the production moved closer to the television studios in Leeds.

This scene was shot exactly as found. To be clear, I did not hire or position the donkey for rustic effect. Maybe it was an Emmerdale extra on its lunch break.

The Road to Damascus

Given the evidence of the past eighty years, and especially this past week, it’s difficult to imagine the Middle East has ever known peace. Yet when these words were written in 1926, Beirut and Damascus were recommended to well-heeled tourists looking for an exotic travel experience.

M_BeirutBeirut …. [is a] busy port and a flourishing Syrian town. The visitor sees evidence of this in the fine harbour, the shipping, the commercial buildings and busy streets. But the East is ever present in the native portions of the population with the varied costumes and dwellings. Beirut has its good hotels, fine buildings and a stately Government House from the roof of which one gets a glorious view of the Mountains of Lebanon and the beautiful surroundings to the town.

M_desertThe Lebanon Mountains and plains between provide scenery of remarkable beauty. Contrasting indeed is that apparently trackless waste, the Syrian Desert. Hot, dry and desolate, at times there is practically no vegitation, while after rain, the desert becomes an almost impassable quagmire. On occasions bands of Bedouin horsemen spring seemingly from nowhere, friendly or otherwise, to disappear as quickly as they came. Camel caravans set out to cross this uninviting area, but for the 600-mile journey to Bagdad the motor transport is preferable to the traveller. The cars start from Beirut, additional passengers being picked up at Damascus.

M_olivesThe ancient capital of Syria is set in delightful surroundings, the minarets and domes rising above the white-terraced roofs completing a picture of impressive beauty. Entering Damascus, most of the streets are narrow and ill-kept, while the houses are in a state of dilapidation. But there are many places of interest; the magnificent Great Mosque, the Mosque of the Whirling Dervishes and numerous others. The bazaars also are particularly attractive. Damascus has of course much association with Biblical history. The traveller can pass along the famous ‘Street called Straight’ and can view the window said to be the one from which St. Paul was let down in a basket, also the houses reputed to have been those of Ananias and Naaman the Leper.

M_Damascus street
‘Around the Mediterranean’ cigarette card series, Major Drapkin & Co., makers of the famous ‘Greys’ cigarettes. 1926.

An Irish taxi

With St. Patrick’s Day coming up this weekend I thought I’d get in early and share these impressions of an Irish jaunting car from 1935.

A J. Valentine postcard from 1935.

Postcard by J. Valentine from 1935.

Postcard by J. Valentine from 1935.

Postcard by J. Valentine from 1935.

Postcard by J. Valentine from 1935.

Postcards by Valentines.